1930's
1940's

1920

From Brewers to Cheese Mongers

When Prohibition begins, the company drops “Brewing” from their name and changes course to something the temperance movement (not to mention Wisconsin-ites) can get on board with: Cheese. Pabst-ett cheese is produced at a farm upstate and aged in the brewery’s ice cellars. The company also produces soft drinks and malt extract, which is marketed—thanks to a lack of Surgeon General warnings—as a tonic for nursing mothers.

From Brewers to Cheese Mongers

1930

Dairy Overload

Pabst’s cheese making business is thriving, with more than 8 million pounds of Pabst-ett sold. Know what goes great with cheese? Bootleg beer.

Dairy Overload

1933

Back to Brewing

When Prohibition ends, Pabst sells their cheese operations to Kraft and gets back to the good stuff—brewing Pabst Blue Ribbon and tying iconic blue silk ribbons around them. The beer is as popular as it was before Prohibition. (And likely during.)

Back to Brewing

1934

The Nation Needs its Beer

Pabst purchases the Premier Malt Products Company in Peoria, IL to boost production in response to post-Prohibition (and tailgate) demand.

The Nation Needs its Beer

1935

An American Export

When Prohibition begins, the company drops “Brewing” from their name and changes course to something the temperance movement (not to mention Wisconsin-ites) can get on board with: Cheese. Pabst-ett cheese is produced at a farm upstate and aged in the brewery’s ice cellars. The company also produces soft drinks and malt extract, which is marketed—thanks to a lack of Surgeon General warnings—as a tonic for nursing mothers.

An American Export

1948

Pabst Blue Ribbon Bouts

From 1948 to 1955, Pabst was the title sponsor of Pabst Blue Ribbon Bouts, a weekly boxing match that aired on major television networks. The program featured many fights from top US arenas, as well as regular title bouts.

Pabst Blue Ribbon Bouts